Peru dating customs

There are distinct differences in the pattern of daily life for Peruvians, depending on their social class and whether they live in rural or urban settings.Most people who live in rural areas are very dependent on the agricultural cycle.In coastal areas, traditional cooking is called In urban areas, people dress in typical Western-style clothing.In rural areas, however, traditional clothing styles date back to the colonial period.Several such celebrations have taken on national importance; the processions in Lima each October related to the Señor de los Milagros (“Lord of Miracles”; referring to a colonial-era image of Christ that survived an earthquake in 1655) are the most important.Other festivals—such as those that relate to the Cross of Motupe in northern coastal Peru, the Virgin of Copacabana near Lake Titicaca, Holy Week in Ayacucho, or the Lord of Coylluriti on Ocongate Mountain south of Cuzco —are still of great regional importance for the people of Peru.Such people make up the majority of the population in squatter settlements that surround the major urban areas.The life of the upper middle class and more affluent residents of Peru’s cities is much different from that of the urban poor.

Relatively few of the poorer residents have good jobs within the formal Peruvian economy; often they must work two or three jobs, and they have less leisure time than other Peruvians.

The most important meal is usually taken shortly after noon; most families assemble for this dinner.

The early afternoon is reserved for the siesta (nap) hour, followed by a return to work for those who are employed; for those who are not, it is a time for relaxing, paying social visits, participating in sporting activities, or watching a favourite (soap opera).

The herding of sheep, llamas, and alpacas takes place at elevations above the limits of agriculture; pastoralists follow a distinct annual cycle that in many ways is more difficult (and certainly more isolated) than that of rural farmers.

Religious festivals, weddings, baptisms, and similar occasions are often the only disruptions to the rigours of rural life, and these events are communal, with entire villages sharing in a family’s celebration.

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